domingo, 18 de fevereiro de 2007

New towers paint the town green

Publicado por:

Office towers aren’t what they used to be. True, they’re as tall as ever, if not taller, but now they mean something different – the symbolism has changed.

The edifice complex hasn’t exactly disappeared, but today it’s tempered by the sustainability reflex.

Originally, the skyscraper was all about corporate might – mine’s bigger than yours. Now it’s about doing what’s right. There are examples everywhere. In New York, the Bank of America is building the tallest green tower in the world. In Europe, green skyscrapers have been around since the 1980s.

Finally, Toronto’s getting into the act, and in a big way. After an absence of 10 or 15 years, when the only high-rises built in this city were residential – i.e., condos – the office tower is making a comeback. Last year 180 Queen St. W. was completed, though at 17 storeys it barely qualifies as a tower. And we mustn’t forget the SAS Building, 280 King St. E., a mid-rise corporate headquarters notable for its “sustainable” features.

But three skyscrapers now under construction are all tall and green: Brookfield Properties’ Bay-Adelaide Centre (50 storeys), Cadillac Fairview’s RBC Centre (43 storeys) at Simcoe and Wellington Sts., and the Telus Tower (32 storeys) at 25 York St. near the Air Canada Centre (a joint venture of Halcyon Partners Fund, Hospitals of Ontario Pension Plan and Menkes Developments).

All three are going for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certification. That green building rating system, which has become the North American standard for evaluating sustainable architecture, is based on criteria such as materials, heating and cooling efficiency, green roofs and water recycling. The highest rating is platinum, followed by gold.

salve1

This 32-story structure is going up at 25 York St., near the Air Canada Centre.

Source: Toronto Star
To read the full article visit:
http://www.thestar.com/article/182962

Office towers aren’t what they used to be. True, they’re as tall as ever, if not taller, but now they mean something different – the symbolism has changed.

The edifice complex hasn’t exactly disappeared, but today it’s tempered by the sustainability reflex.

Originally, the skyscraper was all about corporate might – mine’s bigger than yours. Now it’s about doing what’s right. There are examples everywhere. In New York, the Bank of America is building the tallest green tower in the world. In Europe, green skyscrapers have been around since the 1980s.

Finally, Toronto’s getting into the act, and in a big way. After an absence of 10 or 15 years, when the only high-rises built in this city were residential – i.e., condos – the office tower is making a comeback. Last year 180 Queen St. W. was completed, though at 17 storeys it barely qualifies as a tower. And we mustn’t forget the SAS Building, 280 King St. E., a mid-rise corporate headquarters notable for its “sustainable” features.

But three skyscrapers now under construction are all tall and green: Brookfield Properties’ Bay-Adelaide Centre (50 storeys), Cadillac Fairview’s RBC Centre (43 storeys) at Simcoe and Wellington Sts., and the Telus Tower (32 storeys) at 25 York St. near the Air Canada Centre (a joint venture of Halcyon Partners Fund, Hospitals of Ontario Pension Plan and Menkes Developments).

All three are going for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certification. That green building rating system, which has become the North American standard for evaluating sustainable architecture, is based on criteria such as materials, heating and cooling efficiency, green roofs and water recycling. The highest rating is platinum, followed by gold.salve1

This 32-story structure is going up at 25 York St., near the Air Canada Centre.

Source: Toronto Star
To read the full article visit:
http://www.thestar.com/article/182962

Office towers aren’t what they used to be. True, they’re as tall as ever, if not taller, but now they mean something different – the symbolism has changed.

The edifice complex hasn’t exactly disappeared, but today it’s tempered by the sustainability reflex.

Originally, the skyscraper was all about corporate might – mine’s bigger than yours. Now it’s about doing what’s right. There are examples everywhere. In New York, the Bank of America is building the tallest green tower in the world. In Europe, green skyscrapers have been around since the 1980s.

Finally, Toronto’s getting into the act, and in a big way. After an absence of 10 or 15 years, when the only high-rises built in this city were residential – i.e., condos – the office tower is making a comeback. Last year 180 Queen St. W. was completed, though at 17 storeys it barely qualifies as a tower. And we mustn’t forget the SAS Building, 280 King St. E., a mid-rise corporate headquarters notable for its “sustainable” features.

But three skyscrapers now under construction are all tall and green: Brookfield Properties’ Bay-Adelaide Centre (50 storeys), Cadillac Fairview’s RBC Centre (43 storeys) at Simcoe and Wellington Sts., and the Telus Tower (32 storeys) at 25 York St. near the Air Canada Centre (a joint venture of Halcyon Partners Fund, Hospitals of Ontario Pension Plan and Menkes Developments).

All three are going for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certification. That green building rating system, which has become the North American standard for evaluating sustainable architecture, is based on criteria such as materials, heating and cooling efficiency, green roofs and water recycling. The highest rating is platinum, followed by gold.salve1

This 32-story structure is going up at 25 York St., near the Air Canada Centre.

Source: Toronto Star
To read the full article visit:
http://www.thestar.com/article/182962



No blog Salve o Planeta Terra, você pode acompanhar notícias sobre o meio ambiente, dicas de preservação e atividades da SetWeb relacionadas ao assunto.




newsletter

cadastre seu e-mail!  



SetWeb no Facebook


últimas do twitter

» siga a setweb no twitter

swTV

 

Atuando no mercado desde 1999, a SetWeb conta com um time de profissionais que busca soluções adequadas e eficazes para a sua empresa. Aliando estratégia à tecnologia, a SetWeb possui como foco principal o resultado de ações implementadas para cada negócio.
Esse é o nosso compromisso e o nosso desafio.